The 11 stranger things we’ve learned about science, technology, engineering, and math

The American Institute of Physics (AIP) will host its 11th annual conference later this month.

This year, the AIP will focus on “The Eleven Stranger Things We’ve Learned About Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.”

According to the conference’s website, this year’s theme is “The Next 10 Years: Exploring The Future Of the 21st Century.”

The theme is part of the AIA’s 10-year Vision for the future.

This theme was previously offered at the 2012 AIA conference in Chicago.

The 10-years vision describes a “world in which science and technology are embraced by society as a way to benefit humanity, and in which the arts, sciences, and humanities are developed and encouraged to enrich our lives and enhance our quality of life.”

In the AIE, the theme is that “the world is becoming more and more interconnected,” and that this is a “good thing.”

The AIP describes its vision as follows: The 10th anniversary of the 10th International Conference on the Future of the 21-Century was held in Boston.

The theme was ‘The Next Ten Years: Explore the Future Of The 21st Climate.’

In the 10 years that have gone by since then, the global population has increased from 2 billion to 8 billion.

The AIA has a goal to increase the number of people on the planet to 10 billion by 2026, and to achieve this goal by 2050, it will be “making a concerted effort to expand the range of possibilities for human interaction with nature.”

The conference’s “vision,” according to the AIES website, is that the “science and technology community has the tools and expertise to solve complex problems and create a sustainable and prosperous world, a world that includes people who can learn to live together in harmony, and a world where our children can enjoy the same opportunities as our parents.”

The “vision” also includes “developing a new paradigm for public-private partnership, in which public investment is shared and shared benefits are shared with society and citizens.

The “next 10 years” vision says that this means “developments in human-computer interaction, the development of robotics, AI, nanotechnology, renewable energy, advanced robotics, sustainable manufacturing, nanotechnologies, energy storage, and clean technologies are the way forward.

The vision also includes an emphasis on “the interdependence of human and machine and the value of human creativity.”

In other words, we want to build a society where “creativity is embraced, where science and engineering are embraced, and where science is harnessed to solve problems and build a sustainable world.”

There is a sense that this will be the year where the AIGA will make a “big splash,” because the Aies vision is that it will “build a new future for humanity.”

The idea of creating a new “future” in the 21 century is not new.

For many years, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) have worked together on the theme of the Next 10 years.

The AAAS has a “vision for the next decade,” which it describes as follows (in part): In the next 10 years, we will advance knowledge about our planet, our environment, our species, and our world as a whole.

Our planet will be more habitable.

We will have more renewable resources, better water supplies, and less pollution.

We can design a sustainable energy system.

We need to create jobs for the 1 percent.

We are more connected than ever before.

We must address climate change, the pollution of our oceans, and the threat of pandemic.

And we will make progress on the “next generation of sustainable technologies.”

There’s a bit more to this theme.

In a 2012 paper, “The Future of Science, Engineering and Math: The Vision for a New Millennium,” the authors write that “humanity must lead the world toward a more prosperous future.”

The authors write: We can accomplish these goals by building a future in which our world’s capacity for creative thinking and scientific discovery is harnessing and harnessing science to help us improve the quality of our lives, our world, and, ultimately, our future.

We should be proud of our successes.

And in a 2013 paper, titled “What’s Next?

A Framework for an Adaptive Vision for Our 21st century,” the AIC authors wrote that “a new century should be the decade of a more inclusive, open, and prosperous society.”

They also wrote: As our world becomes more connected, we must invest in new technologies and services that make it possible to create more opportunities for the 99 percent of people in the United States, the world.

AIC also has a section on the topic of “Science and Technology in the Next 20 Years.”

It states: As we build and expand our capacity to explore, harness, and apply new scientific and engineering